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National Center for Cultural Competence Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
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HRSA- and SAMHSA-Funded Projects and Initiatives

With funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and others, the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC) develops projects that provide services to local, state, federal, and international governmental agencies, family advocacy and support organizations, local hospitals and health centers, healthcare systems, health plans, mental health systems, universities, quality improvement organizations, national professional associations, and foundations.

The Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, the SIDS/SUID and the Division of MCH Workforce Development Projects of the National Center for Cultural Competence are funded by  the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (grant number U40MC00145-17-00).

Key projects include:

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs

Happy mom and child at the zooThe NCCC has a project dedicated to children and youth with special health needs and their families. The purpose of the Children & Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) Project is to assist state Title V Maternal and Child Health and CSHCN programs to design, implement and evaluate culturally and linguistically competent service delivery and support systems.

The project is funded by the Division of Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs (DSCSHCN), Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, (DHHS).

The National SUID/SIDS Project

Mother and ChildDespite a decline in overall infant mortality in the United States and an approximately 50% initial decline in reported SUIDs (Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths) since the institution of the Back to Sleep Campaign, there continue to be significant racial and ethnic disparities in the rates of infant death. Thus the families needing both bereavement support and risk reduction efforts are more likely to be culturally, racially and ethnically diverse.

This project is designed to impact state and local SUID/SIDS programs, family support and advocacy organizations, national organizations related to SUID/SIDS issues and the three other National Centers funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). Activities of the project are designed to increase the capacity of these programs and organizations to incorporate cultural and linguistic competence into their services and supports, materials and training efforts and community engagement.

Division of MCH Workforce Development

Paper ChainThe purpose of the Division of MCH Workforce Development (DMCHWFD) Project of the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC) is to increase the capacity of DMCHWFD-funded programs to incorporate principles and practices of cultural and linguistic competency in all aspects of leadership training.

Specifically, the NCCC is developing a series of modules that focus on four key curricula content areas in cultural and linguistic competency that are essential to health care practitioners.

Circle LogoChild and Adolescent Mental Health

The Cultural Competence Initiative is a collaborative effort of the National Center for Cultural Competence (NCCC) and the National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health. The Initiative focuses on four key areas - Technical Assistance and Consultation to System of Care Communities, Leadership, State & Local Policy Development and Evaluation.

The National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health is funded through a Cooperative Agreement with the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health & Human Service.

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